Hot Best Seller

The Spanish Flu: A History from Beginning to End

Availability: Ready to download

The 1918 outbreak of the H1N1 strain of influenza, popularly known as the Spanish flu, killed more people worldwide than World War I, which ended the same year. It infected nearly one-third of the world’s population and killed ten percent of those it struck. In its wake, schools and businesses closed, hospitals became overwhelmed, and the sick spilled out into makeshift ca The 1918 outbreak of the H1N1 strain of influenza, popularly known as the Spanish flu, killed more people worldwide than World War I, which ended the same year. It infected nearly one-third of the world’s population and killed ten percent of those it struck. In its wake, schools and businesses closed, hospitals became overwhelmed, and the sick spilled out into makeshift care centers in public spaces. Policemen, public transportation workers, and everyday citizens in face masks were a common—and eerie—sight. Yet, discussion of this global pandemic often takes a backseat to World War I and other contemporary events.


Compare

The 1918 outbreak of the H1N1 strain of influenza, popularly known as the Spanish flu, killed more people worldwide than World War I, which ended the same year. It infected nearly one-third of the world’s population and killed ten percent of those it struck. In its wake, schools and businesses closed, hospitals became overwhelmed, and the sick spilled out into makeshift ca The 1918 outbreak of the H1N1 strain of influenza, popularly known as the Spanish flu, killed more people worldwide than World War I, which ended the same year. It infected nearly one-third of the world’s population and killed ten percent of those it struck. In its wake, schools and businesses closed, hospitals became overwhelmed, and the sick spilled out into makeshift care centers in public spaces. Policemen, public transportation workers, and everyday citizens in face masks were a common—and eerie—sight. Yet, discussion of this global pandemic often takes a backseat to World War I and other contemporary events.

30 review for The Spanish Flu: A History from Beginning to End

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    "The worst pandemic in modern history was the Spanish flu of 1918, which killed tens of millions of people. Today, with how interconnected the world is, it would spread faster." --Bill Gates With the coronavirus spreading everywhere, I was a bit nervous about starting this book, but I finally talked myself into it. It was very short and easy to read but also very informative. "The worst pandemic in modern history was the Spanish flu of 1918, which killed tens of millions of people. Today, with how interconnected the world is, it would spread faster." --Bill Gates With the coronavirus spreading everywhere, I was a bit nervous about starting this book, but I finally talked myself into it. It was very short and easy to read but also very informative.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kavitha Sivakumar

    3.5 star. The book is written in May 2020, so there are comparisons to COVID-19. I believe, wikipedia has a more comprehensive summary of this epidemic than this book. More opinions than facts which surprised me as I was expecting facts summarized in hourly history books.

  3. 5 out of 5

    CRG

    A clarification made in this book, as I’d read in many other books, is that "The Spanish Flu" was not born in Spain. However, someone named it because some Spanish doctors were the first to notice it. I read elsewhere that the Spanish newspapers called it "The British Flue" because doctors who worked as volunteers in the French army in southern France saw hundreds of British soldiers die from the 1918 Flu, almost instantly, between two or three hours, after their first symptoms. Yet, the author A clarification made in this book, as I’d read in many other books, is that "The Spanish Flu" was not born in Spain. However, someone named it because some Spanish doctors were the first to notice it. I read elsewhere that the Spanish newspapers called it "The British Flue" because doctors who worked as volunteers in the French army in southern France saw hundreds of British soldiers die from the 1918 Flu, almost instantly, between two or three hours, after their first symptoms. Yet, the author of this book tells us that someone first detected it in France; still, they kept it a secret until a Spanish newspaper spread to the world what those Spanish doctors had noticed. Remember, Spain didn’t involve in the First World War, which means they had more time to analyze WWI’s produced. I think we should be grateful to those Spanish doctors. Despite of names and all the speculations, the first outbreak is unknown, even a hundred years later; possibly was started in Kansas, USA, Etaples, France, or China. Rather than focus on the names of the 1918’s flu pandemic, we should have given high recognition and probably a Nobel Prize to those brave doctors who warned people of the risks of the pandemic and educated the public that started quarantining and did better sanitation globally. That is what we must embrace. Good actions!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bettye McKee

    Very interesting Although the pandemic did not originate in Spain, it came to be called the Spanish flu because only Spain spoke freely about it. In 1918, World War I was being fought, and many countries involved in the war suppressed all information about the illness. It was widely spread by the movement of troops. The Spanish flu was responsible for three times as many deaths as World War I. Some 500 million cases were reported, approximately one third of the world population at the time, and th Very interesting Although the pandemic did not originate in Spain, it came to be called the Spanish flu because only Spain spoke freely about it. In 1918, World War I was being fought, and many countries involved in the war suppressed all information about the illness. It was widely spread by the movement of troops. The Spanish flu was responsible for three times as many deaths as World War I. Some 500 million cases were reported, approximately one third of the world population at the time, and there were 50 million deaths from the virus. The pandemic lasted for three years. All A strains of flu since that time have been descendants of the Spanish flu. Although it has mutated numerous times since then, it remains deadly as in the Asian flu, the Hong Kong flu, the swine flu, H1N1, and so forth. This brief history should be read by everyone as it also discusses COVID-19. 1

  5. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Very informative!

  6. 4 out of 5

    D. Thrush

    This little book at 43 pages is especially interesting now during our own pandemic. There will always be viruses in the world and looming pandemics. We can learn from history. It’s interesting how similar the 1918 Spanish flu is to COVID-19. People isolated and wore masks and had a fear of foreigners. Today worldwide travel exacerbates the problem of spreading viruses between countries. The books in this series always have a few errors but are otherwise very good.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Madelon

    There is no doubt in my mind that the coronavirus and its concomitant COVID-19 has sparked an interest in other pandemics. It no doubt behooves us to examine the Spanish Flu of 1918 in light of current conditions. World War I played a definite role in the spread of the Spanish flu, which you might think originated in Spain, but it did not. Politics and the war effort produced a kind of coverup where "Germany, the United States, France, and Great Britain all censored information about the flu with There is no doubt in my mind that the coronavirus and its concomitant COVID-19 has sparked an interest in other pandemics. It no doubt behooves us to examine the Spanish Flu of 1918 in light of current conditions. World War I played a definite role in the spread of the Spanish flu, which you might think originated in Spain, but it did not. Politics and the war effort produced a kind of coverup where "Germany, the United States, France, and Great Britain all censored information about the flu within their borders and kept it quiet, until it hit Spain. Because Spain was a non-combatant, journalists and media were free to report on it there." It is unclear exactly where this strain of influenza first appeared and is still a matter of study today. This short history was surely written in response to the current COVID-19 pandemic since comparisons to the Spanish flu are made. There are several big takeaways in this book. First, and foremost in my mind, is that governments suppress information to the detriment of their citizens. In 1918 it was the war effort, in which Spain was not a participant, thus the falsely blamed source of the pandemic. In the 2019 COVID-19 pandemic, government inaction and incompetence, particularly in the United States, has (as of this writing) caused over 100,00 deaths in this country. Second, these pandemics aren't one and done; they come in waves. The second wave of the Spanish flu was far worse than the first. The third wave was on a par with the second. The COVID-19 pandemic, still in its technical first wave, is starting to see a second wave immediately on top of the first due to a lack of mandatory federal rules governing social behavior. Third, and probably most obvious, is that history always repeats itself. The Black Death, the Spanish flu, and now COVID-19 all have in common the decimation of populations. It would be unfair not to point out that during the time of Spanish flu medicine was not what it is today. To get a real feel for the disease that took the lives of strong, healthy human beings, in 1918-1920, along with this book, I highly recommend watching "Influenza 1918," part of PBS American Experience series.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Paul Fox

    Excellent 👍 This is an excellent introduction to a period of history that has been under reported. In conjunction with the end of the First World War, this deadly and highly contagious version of the H1N1 flu continues to be felt to this day. The end of the most devastating war left Europe in shambles, only to be hit with a wave of flu as horrible as the war itself. The people of Europe, victor and loser alike, were victims of an illness that left death in it's wake and unforeseen reverberations Excellent 👍 This is an excellent introduction to a period of history that has been under reported. In conjunction with the end of the First World War, this deadly and highly contagious version of the H1N1 flu continues to be felt to this day. The end of the most devastating war left Europe in shambles, only to be hit with a wave of flu as horrible as the war itself. The people of Europe, victor and loser alike, were victims of an illness that left death in it's wake and unforeseen reverberations for decades. In America, soldiers and civilian's suffered as well. Even Woodrow Wilson found himself a victim while in France attending to the peace. The British P.M. would nearly succumbed to the flu himself. Reading this book, while sheltering in place from the Covid19 in 2020, I see history repeating itself. We must, make the right decisions based upon science, not superstition. If we are to avoid a second, and more deadly outbreak, like the Spanish flu; we must put our faith in our doctors and scientist's to make those decisions for us. If not we could be looking at a repeat of the mistakes made one hundred years ago. Any such mistakes would be so much more tragic for us today. To know so much more scientifically and allow the deaths of innocents in as great (or greater) numbers, would truly be a singular setback in the history of humankind.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie Gleckler Clark

    The similarities between the Spanish Flu (as it was named) and COVID-19 are striking. I am so glad I read this Hourly History. Though much is known about the Spanish Flu and therefore also COVID-19, there is much to be taken from the earlier pandemic. Our World has utilized many of the techniques attempted in 1918-1920 to try to control this newest of flu outbreaks. This report, if you will, makes you stop and think about how history does repeat itself, and how there is so much to be learned. Livi The similarities between the Spanish Flu (as it was named) and COVID-19 are striking. I am so glad I read this Hourly History. Though much is known about the Spanish Flu and therefore also COVID-19, there is much to be taken from the earlier pandemic. Our World has utilized many of the techniques attempted in 1918-1920 to try to control this newest of flu outbreaks. This report, if you will, makes you stop and think about how history does repeat itself, and how there is so much to be learned. Living through COVID-19 seems challenging, but after reading about the Spanish Flu and all that was lost, I can only be grateful that we are handling ourselves the way we are with “Stay in Place” and “Social distancing” orders. COVID-19 has impacted us in so many ways, but though there has been some devastation, it has yet (and hopefully will not) reach the catastrophic numbers of the Spanish Flu. If you pick up this short report and read it, may you have stayed safe during this most recent pandemic.

  10. 4 out of 5

    David Parker

    From an economic standpoint, the second wave of the virus was nothing short of disastrous. But as the virus spread to more and more countries, businesses began to close. Some closed willingly in an attempt to avoid exposure for owners and workers. In other cases, local governments forced businesses to close and citizens to remain in quarantine in an effort to contain the virus. In still other cases, either owners or too many employees perished, which also forced businesses to close. Many countries From an economic standpoint, the second wave of the virus was nothing short of disastrous. But as the virus spread to more and more countries, businesses began to close. Some closed willingly in an attempt to avoid exposure for owners and workers. In other cases, local governments forced businesses to close and citizens to remain in quarantine in an effort to contain the virus. In still other cases, either owners or too many employees perished, which also forced businesses to close. Many countries not only did not have adequate healthcare systems to deal with the sick, but they did not have adequate welfare systems either, and poverty and starvation became serious threats as well.

  11. 5 out of 5

    William O. Robertson

    The essay writers obviously politicizes the 1918-1920 pandemic to make the case of how things went wrong with combating the current COVID-19 crisis. It was odd when the writer(s) describe how the COVID-19 virus was successfully fought early on and I quote: “...cities and other places that issued lockdown orders early and enforced them strictly saw fewer deaths and infections than other places.” No mention of the cities and “other places” are referenced of this supposedly “success.” A convenient The essay writers obviously politicizes the 1918-1920 pandemic to make the case of how things went wrong with combating the current COVID-19 crisis. It was odd when the writer(s) describe how the COVID-19 virus was successfully fought early on and I quote: “...cities and other places that issued lockdown orders early and enforced them strictly saw fewer deaths and infections than other places.” No mention of the cities and “other places” are referenced of this supposedly “success.” A convenient omission? The narrative was interesting to read, but there does appear to be an underlying motive as to why this essay is being released at this time. I wanted facts, not a political commentary.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Reitmeyer

    Enlightening I learned much from this short look at the Spanish influenza. I particularly found the information about how the Spanish Influenza impacted the world afterward to be enlightening. Reading this with the on going pandemic happening, it brings up some interesting similarities. It also explains a bit about transmission and detection issues doctors faced. Now these were obviously drastically different circumstances but it is hard to read this with out drawing obvious parallels between the Enlightening I learned much from this short look at the Spanish influenza. I particularly found the information about how the Spanish Influenza impacted the world afterward to be enlightening. Reading this with the on going pandemic happening, it brings up some interesting similarities. It also explains a bit about transmission and detection issues doctors faced. Now these were obviously drastically different circumstances but it is hard to read this with out drawing obvious parallels between the two situations.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Terri Gostola

    I have read quite a number of these "Hourly Histories" and this is one of the better ones I have read. The information was logical and straightforward. The writing was good and I saw no obvious typos or misspellings. In a few places some information was repeated but nothing too annoying. In the end, I felt like I learned a lot from this book. It is work the read. I have read quite a number of these "Hourly Histories" and this is one of the better ones I have read. The information was logical and straightforward. The writing was good and I saw no obvious typos or misspellings. In a few places some information was repeated but nothing too annoying. In the end, I felt like I learned a lot from this book. It is work the read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    SADIK BAYDERE

    Very neat brief of the Spanish Flu of 1918-1919 which enabled me to fill in the gaps I had about this catastrophic pandemic which took lives of 50m. Reading it made me think that if Covid-19 had happened during the conditions of those times, it would have caused a similar, if not more damage than the Spanish Flu...

  15. 4 out of 5

    David W.

    Influenza Really good write-up on the 1918-20 Pandemic and how it is relating to our current worldwide situation- just over a hundred years later. Fortunately humankind is not in the midst of a world war, nor revolutions in major countries and we are able to communicate much faster to ourselves just what needs to be done to prevent the spread of the virus.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Miyahara

    Great Intro to the Social Aspect of a Pandemic The lives of thousands may have been lost to Coronavirus as we slowly remembered the forgotten lessons of the 1918-1920 Pandemic. This short book represents a good starting point for learning about the impact of a pandemic beyond the obvious biological statistics.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Santosh Prabhu

    The information was excellent. But the omission of reference to india was glaring. Out of the 50 million deaths, approximately 12-14 million was in India and it wiped 5-6% of the population. Yet, this does not even come up at all.

  18. 4 out of 5

    N.K. Aning

    The Spanish flu is a chapter in human history which has been kept in the dark for some time. This book provides an expository look into that dark chapter of our history. I enjoyed this short history.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Ewoldt

    This an absolutely great overview of the 1918 Spanis Flu pandemic. Readers Will come away with a very good understanding of both the strategy for overcoming the 2019 Coronavirus pandemic and the origins of the tactics used in this pandemic.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Leon Olivier, Jr

    Good information but repetitive A timely and informative book. Some books like Gina Kolata's book Flu contain a more detailed account but the science may be dated since it was written in the 1990's. I would recommend this book for a introduction. Repetitive at points. Good information but repetitive A timely and informative book. Some books like Gina Kolata's book Flu contain a more detailed account but the science may be dated since it was written in the 1990's. I would recommend this book for a introduction. Repetitive at points.

  21. 4 out of 5

    a.l.s

    Not a bad overview This book is not a bad overview of the 1918 flu, but there are more detailed books out there. The price is what lowered the rating. For such a short history, the price seems a bit high. Good Kindle unlimited pick though

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Gawne

    Timely This little book helps to provide the parallels between 1918 and 2020 relating to the coronavirus and it's spread throughout the world and it's higher danger to certain disadvantaged communities. We need to examine these historical perspectives. Highly recommend. Timely This little book helps to provide the parallels between 1918 and 2020 relating to the coronavirus and it's spread throughout the world and it's higher danger to certain disadvantaged communities. We need to examine these historical perspectives. Highly recommend.

  23. 5 out of 5

    shari lee

    A thorough study of a devastating world wide killer An especially interesting study of an historic pandemic that has many characteristics of the current corona virus pandemic of today.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    Informative A great comparison to the current global pandemic we are in . Basically, this is not our first rodeo to include quarantines and social distancing. And of course, wearing masks then,as now, was mandatory.

  25. 4 out of 5

    John Jackse

    Excellent Book while COVID-19 is out there You either learn from the past or am doomed to repeat it. 200 million people died during the Black Plague. 50 million died during the Spanish flu just 100 years ago. We are getting off easy

  26. 4 out of 5

    Vineeth K

    A must read book Knowing the history will help us to deal with the present situation. It's very important to know atleast a precise history of Spanish flu to deal with the Covid 19 pandemic A must read book Knowing the history will help us to deal with the present situation. It's very important to know atleast a precise history of Spanish flu to deal with the Covid 19 pandemic

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kushagra Agrawal

    While I get the author's intention of explaining a complex issue in a short book, unnecessary redundancies and a lot of opinionated language fail to give the Spanish flu the gravitas it deserves While I get the author's intention of explaining a complex issue in a short book, unnecessary redundancies and a lot of opinionated language fail to give the Spanish flu the gravitas it deserves

  28. 5 out of 5

    Steve Martinson

    An exceptional effort from the 'Hourly History' line. Very detailed, and draws a few cross references to the pandemic of today. Very interesting reading, for just a short history book! An exceptional effort from the 'Hourly History' line. Very detailed, and draws a few cross references to the pandemic of today. Very interesting reading, for just a short history book!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Blackpipe

    Concise, well-represented, and professionally executed. Highly recommended.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Martine

    Well written and informative

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.