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X-Men: Deadly Genesis

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What happens when the skeletons in your closet finally break down the door and come looking for you? The X-Men are about to find out! The mutant community is in turmoil, and the X-Men are bearing the brunt of this New World Order. Amid the chaos, a new enemy awakens, one whose very existence will haunt the founding members of the X-Men like nothing has before. Who is this What happens when the skeletons in your closet finally break down the door and come looking for you? The X-Men are about to find out! The mutant community is in turmoil, and the X-Men are bearing the brunt of this New World Order. Amid the chaos, a new enemy awakens, one whose very existence will haunt the founding members of the X-Men like nothing has before. Who is this new threat? How is he tied to Professor X's darkest secret? Cyclops, Wolverine and the others must find out soon, before they and those closest to them go mad! Collects X-Men: Deadly Genesis #1-6.


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What happens when the skeletons in your closet finally break down the door and come looking for you? The X-Men are about to find out! The mutant community is in turmoil, and the X-Men are bearing the brunt of this New World Order. Amid the chaos, a new enemy awakens, one whose very existence will haunt the founding members of the X-Men like nothing has before. Who is this What happens when the skeletons in your closet finally break down the door and come looking for you? The X-Men are about to find out! The mutant community is in turmoil, and the X-Men are bearing the brunt of this New World Order. Amid the chaos, a new enemy awakens, one whose very existence will haunt the founding members of the X-Men like nothing has before. Who is this new threat? How is he tied to Professor X's darkest secret? Cyclops, Wolverine and the others must find out soon, before they and those closest to them go mad! Collects X-Men: Deadly Genesis #1-6.

30 review for X-Men: Deadly Genesis

  1. 4 out of 5

    Selkie ✦ Queen

    Marvel stopped publishing new X-Men stories in 1970. It had been a five-year long absence then, and Len Wein and Dave Cockrum wouldn't stand for it so they wrote what will be known as the definitive reboot issue entitled Giant-Size X-Men #1 . Introducing Storm, Nightcrawler, Wolverine and Colossus for the first time as part of the new team for the X-Men, it was a spectacular gateway story that led to Chris Claremont's legendary sixteen-year run for The Uncanny X-Men. This monumental is Marvel stopped publishing new X-Men stories in 1970. It had been a five-year long absence then, and Len Wein and Dave Cockrum wouldn't stand for it so they wrote what will be known as the definitive reboot issue entitled Giant-Size X-Men #1 . Introducing Storm, Nightcrawler, Wolverine and Colossus for the first time as part of the new team for the X-Men, it was a spectacular gateway story that led to Chris Claremont's legendary sixteen-year run for The Uncanny X-Men. This monumental issue also addressed why the X-Men had been gone for five years. Apparently, Cyclops, Marvel Girl, Havok, Lorna Dane, Angel and Iceman were sent to scout for a new mutant recruit in the remote island named Krakoa and were trapped there. Weirdly enough, Scott managed to escape and tell the Professor what has happened. Wasting no time as he left Scott to recover in the Xavier Mansion, Charles started going around countries to look for mutants that could aid in the rescue mission. And the rest is history where we get four additional characters who garnered respectively large fanbases as The Uncanny X-Men series went in the capable hands of Claremont, all thanks to Giant-Size. For the 30th year celebration of this classic tale, Ed Brubaker wrote and published this piece. The covers for both Giant-Size and this one are comparable, with this latter one serving as an echo to the original story it was supposed to be based upon. But why is the cover for Brubaker's Deadly Genesis horrific? Why are our heroes portrayed as decomposing zombie corpses? Well, this is because X-Men: Deadly Genesis is more or less a RETCON of the events surrounding Giant-Size X-Men #1. But that in itself is actually misleading---Brubaker simply added a rather upsetting dark twist to what really happened during the rescue mission. It's a doozy. And I'm going to spoil it here in my review. First off, let's contextualize the continuity at this point. This was set after the major catastrophe mind-fuck that was House of M. Scarlet Witch loses her shit and attacks her fellow Avengers, killing Hawkeye. Meanwhile, her father Magneto just eloped with Charles Xavier in Genosha, both aiming to rebuild what was taken from the mutants there (told in Claremont's Excalibur III ). Upon hearing the distressing news of his daughter's breakdown, he rescues her and therefore lets everyone in the world know that he is still alive (he had been officially declared deceased before; they had a burial and all that), including the Avengers who have been hunting him down. Charles was upset about this for obvious reasons. Their relationship was finally in a good place (they finally fucking agreed about something after twenty-something years of rivarly, for fuck's sake) and Erik did not have the common sense to keep it that way, exposing not only their clandestine arrangement (seriously, Xavier didn't even let the X-Men know he's running away with Erik) but also risking Genosha under potential threats coming from their enemies. In Brian Michael Bendis' House of M , Scarlet Witch remakes the world because she has reality-bending abilities that have become quite potent especially after she loses her sanity. Sooner or later, everyone in the Marvelverse (particularly the Avengers and the X-Men) recover their memories and confront her. Magneto was not pleased and almost kills her twin brother and his son Pietro. Pissed beyond fuck, Scarlet Witch punishes Magneto by declaring that the world will no longer have mutants and just like that she rewrote the x-gene out of near non-existence. The number of mutants all across the globe dwindled from thousands to a measly two hundred-plus. She has also rendered her own father stripped from his own electromagnetism. On the other hand, Charles Xavier is missing. The X-Men have to find him. And this is where we find ourselves in Ed Brubaker's Deadly Genesis story. Brubaker's Deadly Genesis is all kinds of awesome what-the-fuckery. A retcon story hasn't been this entertaining and mildly depressing as well as being pretty believable. Divided into six official chapters, the collection itself also has four special issues in between that discussed the origins of these certain young mutants (Petra, Suzanne, Darwin and Kid Vulcan) who will play significant roles in the climactic revelation later on in the story. In their frantic search for their beloved mentor, a strange surge of energy fucks up Emma and Kitty while they were using the Cerebra. As the two recover, Colossus, Nightcrawler and Havok have ghoulish visions from their past. Meanwhile, Cyclops, Wolverine and Rachel Summers (now Marvel Girl) go to their first lead in months concerning the professor's whereabouts. They encounter a new unnamed deadly foe who abducted Scott and Rachel and left Wolverine who goes to find Nightcrawler and Beast. The two have just received a message from Sean (Banshee) who wishes to meet with them, claiming he has uncovered a rather enigmatic video footage from the late Moira MacTaggert. They view the video and were surprised to find her talking shit about Xavier, saying that he was a bastard and that she should have never trusted him. On the other hand, Scott and Rachel try to figure out who has captured them, all the while said asshole starts brutally assaulting Rachel via telepathy, causing everyone in the X-Men connected to Rachel's consciousness to have visions yet again, particularly Scott who is beginning to put the pieces of a certain memory he couldn't understand why he even forgot. The way the graphic novel collection was collected was clever; inserting the special four issues as breaks for every Deadly Genesis chapter has inevitably added to a reader's excitement as they eagerly want to know more about the mystery surrounding what Charles Xavier had done to earn MacTaggert's vehemence. These young mutants that readers have gotten to know fairly enough and sympathize with a bit in their respective special issue were not there to be fillers--it turns out that these lost and confused children were adopted by Moira MacTaggert, Charles' former fiancee and fellow geneticist. They have survived traumatic ordeals after their mutant powers started manifesting and MacTaggert was there to help them deal and harness their abilities under her care. So why is this discovery crucial all of a sudden? In the last issue, Scott and Rachel's captor finally revealed himself as Scott's long-lost younger brother Gabriel. The three of them lured Charles Xavier from hiding and it was revealed that he had also lost his mutant powers. He's now fully human. Still, Gabriel angrily forces the truth out of him with the help of Rachel's own telepathy. And the truth gets told: SPOILER TERRITORY: Before the events in Giant-Size X-Men took place, the rescue team composed of Storm, Wolverine, Colossus, and Nightcrawler (plus Sunfire, Thunderbird and Banshee) were, in actuality, THE SECOND TEAM assembled to save the original X-Men in Krakoa. It turns out that Charles Xavier has pleaded his case to Moira first, asking permission to train and send these teenagers she had just taken under her wing. Moira was understandably reluctant and dismissive of the idea but she wanted the kids to make their own decision about the matter: [CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGES] This scene was rather heartbreaking, actually, when they all answered the professor's request with a resounding YES. Of course, they'll be happy to help. They've idolized the X-Men. They're youngsters who have been terrified of themselves since they learned what they are and how the world would react to them, and now they are finally given a chance to fight for something--to fight for good and help their heroes get back home--so of course, they'll assist the professor. It's goddamn Professor X, founder of the X-Men, and that title alone means they can trust him. Gabriel himself wants to become a part of the X-Men next to his big brother Scott. Charles purposefully reveals this information later on to make sure that Gabriel is properly motivated for the mission, and the boy can't to save his brother and tell him they're family. For the first time, he could actually belong and be with family at last. So Professor X trained the youngsters within a few days but through telepathic manipulation, he was able to make them believe that it had been a handful of months. Because of that deception, the teenagers were able to travel to Krakoa, fearless and ready to take on the challenge. Sadly, it proved too much for all of them. Suzanne got killed first and Petra managed to dug underground with her powers to shield them from other attacks. Next, Darwin, with his reactive mutation, absorbs everyone's powers and preserves them inside Gabriel who was the only one to physically survive the attack. This all happened after they have just rescued Scott and sent him flying back to the mansion using the Blackbird. He makes telepathic contact with the professor upon landing, and together they explored the events in the island and witnessed them all die there (that was what they were led to believe). Devastated of losing his brother so soon, Scott loses consciousness. Charles had to inform Moira about what happened. He then asserted that he is going to make Scott forget about the first team and leave him to recuperate as he went on to recruit the second team which we know from Giant-Size X-Men. Moira had no choice but to comply, probably in fear that Charles will wipe out her memories too. To make sure that the truth will come out someday, she proceeded to make a video, narrating the tragedy of what has happened, probably in hopes of redeeming herself from her own role in the events. Like I said, this is WHAT THE FUCK at its finest moment. Contextualizing Claremont's Excalibur III: Charles and Erik have their second chance of a stable partnership in that series and they have grown so much together there, but then both Bendis' House of M and Brubaker's Deadly Genesis happened and also retracted all their character development from Excalibur III to reveal that their past mistakes have caught up with them at last. Erik could never become a good father to the twins and so Scarlet Witch condemned him by taking away his powers and making the rest of mutantkind suffer the same thing. On the other hand, Charles had knowingly lied about a crucial piece of history and betrayed Scott's trust and soiling the rest of his X-Men's perception of him as a mentor and surrogate father. I've always known Charles Xavier is naturally deceptive. He said so himself in Excalibur III that secrets come easy for him. And now I find it a rather poignant parallel that while Magneto lost his daughter Wanda's trust and gets punished by her for it, Scott in this story also punishes Xavier by banishing him from the mansion. Look at the devastation below: Charles Xavier is no longer a mutant himself and therefore he has no place with the X-Men. This has to be the most extreme invalidation of his character--and quite frankly he deserves it, much like Erik did when Wanda stripped him away of his powers. These two men have skeletons in their closet that came out at the darkest of opportune moments, and now they are paying the price of their actions, even Charles who only had good intentions to start with, but his actions along the way ultimately paved the way to his own personal hell which included losing the respect of his students and his place in their community. Nothing could be worse than this. RECOMMENDED: 9/10 DO READ MY REVIEWS AT:

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Yet another sweeping ret-con from Marvel and an entirely unnecessary one at that. I honestly don't understand why some writers feel like they have to fuck up what came before to make an impact on the book they're writing. In my opinion, the whole 'everything you thought you knew is wrong' tack is lazy writing and more than a little disrespectful to the original creators. Other reasons I wasn't overly keen on this book: 1. The revelation of the third Summers brother was very focused on Scott's reac Yet another sweeping ret-con from Marvel and an entirely unnecessary one at that. I honestly don't understand why some writers feel like they have to fuck up what came before to make an impact on the book they're writing. In my opinion, the whole 'everything you thought you knew is wrong' tack is lazy writing and more than a little disrespectful to the original creators. Other reasons I wasn't overly keen on this book: 1. The revelation of the third Summers brother was very focused on Scott's reaction. The one very short scene where Alex gets to react felt shoehorned in at the last minute, almost as if the writer and editorial team were so focused on the third and first Summers brothers that they almost forgot the second Summers brother was also present. 2. Banshee's death was a little too throwaway for my liking. None of his teammates seemed overly bothered about it. 3. The twist about Krakoa not actually being sentient wasn't fully explained and didn't seem to serve any purpose. Still, it wasn't entirely awful, I suppose.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Artemy

    For a book that's primarily designed to retcon old continuity, retroactively add new characters and shake up the status quo of the pre-existing ones, this one was surprisingly good. Of course, I didn't have any investment in that old continuity, but I think what Brubaker did with Xavier here is quite interesting and fits with my understanding of the character fairly well. And hey, it's superhero comics, it's foolish to complain about those things in the first place. I also liked the backstories For a book that's primarily designed to retcon old continuity, retroactively add new characters and shake up the status quo of the pre-existing ones, this one was surprisingly good. Of course, I didn't have any investment in that old continuity, but I think what Brubaker did with Xavier here is quite interesting and fits with my understanding of the character fairly well. And hey, it's superhero comics, it's foolish to complain about those things in the first place. I also liked the backstories to those four new characters introduced here, and that extra bit of fleshing out made all the difference in turning them from nameless redshirts to characters who you at least somewhat care about when shit hits the fan in the final issue of this mini-series. Overall, it was a helluva dark story, and an excellent start to Brubaker's X-Men run — can't wait to see what's next!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    I don't know why so many 1-star ratings for this...it's a crucial piece in the X-Men world. This is a hard one to review without spoilers but let's try this: When the original X-Men (Cyclops, Angel, Jean etc.) were trapped on Krakoa, Wolverine's team wasn't the first one sent to rescue them...! There's also the death of a X-Man who I really never saw much of in the comics, I think underutilized would be the word for him. But with the nature of comics, maybe he's been revived by now... Either way t I don't know why so many 1-star ratings for this...it's a crucial piece in the X-Men world. This is a hard one to review without spoilers but let's try this: When the original X-Men (Cyclops, Angel, Jean etc.) were trapped on Krakoa, Wolverine's team wasn't the first one sent to rescue them...! There's also the death of a X-Man who I really never saw much of in the comics, I think underutilized would be the word for him. But with the nature of comics, maybe he's been revived by now... Either way this explores the relationship between Professor X and the team, especially Cyclops, and to a lesser extent, Havok. This reveals some of Charles' actions that weren't exactly on the up and up telepathically speaking... Well worth a read, Brubaker tells good stories always, and I don't know why people don't like the art, there's nothing wrong with it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tiago

    Deadly Genesis marked a turning point on the X-Men because this was the story where Charles Xavier really fucked it up, I've already read this book before and completely forgot it was on this title, it's funny because this is also a story about memory manipulation, anyway, I've read the whole thing all over again and enjoyed it more this time around. My road to War of Kings continues, next stop, Rise and Fall of the Shi'ar Empire.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    So, it wasn't bad. The concept is interesting. Mostly I'm glad it's over with. The execution and pacing seemed off. It was going for this big, reveal-y, mystery twist that was supposed to wow the reader into a convulsive stupor or something. But after a while, I just wanted them to get to it. The reveal was flat. The new stuff about this unknown X-Men team was the most interesting part. Getting to that sooner and running with it would have been much more entertaining. And the villain was an over So, it wasn't bad. The concept is interesting. Mostly I'm glad it's over with. The execution and pacing seemed off. It was going for this big, reveal-y, mystery twist that was supposed to wow the reader into a convulsive stupor or something. But after a while, I just wanted them to get to it. The reveal was flat. The new stuff about this unknown X-Men team was the most interesting part. Getting to that sooner and running with it would have been much more entertaining. And the villain was an over the top big bad cliche. Your basic former good person whose angst at his mentor drove him over the edge to unredeemable villain-hood. Every one must pay for how wronged he was. But I didn't even buy how he was so wronged. His team went on a mission, which they consented to knowing it was extremely dangerous, and they got their butts handed to them. But he survived. So basically he's just an inherent douche who blames others for his issues. Am I missing something? But this will hopefully make for some good drama in Brubaker's Uncanny run. But I'm not particularly optimistic. I'm fairly new to Brubaker, but his M.O. so far seems to be heavy handed drama that is interesting but drawn out for dramatic effect, which instead ends up being kinda boring...but, you know, still just interesting enough to keep you reading.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    For the 30th anniversary of Giant Size X-Men #1, the X book that revitalized the team and made them popular again, Marvel put out this storyline, which also served as a jumping off point for Ed Brubaker's X-Men run. It's kind of weird, though, because their way of honoring Giant Size X-Men was to totally retcon it. This book doesn't completely remove all of the events of that book, they still technically "happened," but it's still a weird move, particularly since the retcon itself doesn't really For the 30th anniversary of Giant Size X-Men #1, the X book that revitalized the team and made them popular again, Marvel put out this storyline, which also served as a jumping off point for Ed Brubaker's X-Men run. It's kind of weird, though, because their way of honoring Giant Size X-Men was to totally retcon it. This book doesn't completely remove all of the events of that book, they still technically "happened," but it's still a weird move, particularly since the retcon itself doesn't really add anything to the story. There were any number of ways to tell the same story without deconstructing a book from 30 years ago. Anyway, in this volume we're introduced to Vulcan, a mysterious, insanely powerful mutant we've never seen before. I was kind of surprised by the similarities between this storyline and Winter Soldier, Brubaker's first story on Captain America, which also sought to introduce a seemingly long-dead character via gradual buildup and mystery. It feels a little formulaic, when you compare the two? I mean, I'm willing to forgive Brubaker of this, because I know he isn't a formulaic writer in the least (all his work with Sean Phillips is some of my favorite stuff in comics), but it still seemed to echo the structure of Winter Soldier a little too much. That said, Brubaker's storytelling style just works. While nothing hyper original or thrilling happens here, and at times even feels kind of anticlimactic (such as when (view spoiler)[Xavier just kind of shows up again despite months of searching by the X-Men, or when Banshee dies completely out of nowhere (hide spoiler)] ), it's still written in a solidly entertaining way. There are so many comics writers who have no idea how to keep a story flowing from panel to panel, and this is something Brubaker will seemingly never mess up. That said, Vulcan just isn't an impressive new addition to the X-Men rogues gallery (at least not yet, I know he comes back in later stories that I haven't read). When he's first revealed, he seems like an unbeatable, ultrapowerful super-enemy, with no real weak spots to speak of. I got hooked by this. I wanted to know what the X-Men could possibly do to stop someone who seemingly had an answer for anything they could throw at him. But as the story progresses and more is revealed about Vulcan, the less menacing he seems, until ultimately he just comes across as a whiny, undisciplined teenager who never "got his way" or something. There's also a little discrepancy I feel like a total dork for pointing out. At the end of House of M, the lingering question is "If Scarlet Witch took away all the energy-wielding mutants' powers, where did all the energy go" (law of conservation of energy, of course). Well, in the New Avengers storyline The Collective, that question is answered. All of the energy flows into a single person, giving the Avengers a massively powerful new enemy to combat. Well, at the beginning of Deadly Genesis, that same "where did the energy go" question is asked, and then the answer seems to be that some of it went into Vulcan to reawaken him. Well, which is it, Marvel? It can't really be both. Seems like if you want to bring a character back from the dead, you are going to do it (see: every superhero in the Marvel universe), so maybe don't split the consequences of a major plotline to suit whatever purpose you need. Dork Time over. Anyway, while I found this book pretty disappointing, I wouldn't call it flat-out "bad." There's some great character work, and the first few issues are downright thrilling. It seems to be setting up a lot of potentially interesting things down the road, so I'm going to give it the benefit of the doubt. That said, if you never read this, you will not regret it on your deathbed.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    In short, this is a weak story with several plot holes which makes a mockery of a franchise that already has a history of reworking established continuity to poor results. To what end? Another Summers brother who is completely disinteresting, another story in which Professor X acts like a jerk, a dead X-Men (for absolutely no good reason), and some horrible reworking of existing long running history to cram it all in which now require secrets to have been kept by several key characters for the l In short, this is a weak story with several plot holes which makes a mockery of a franchise that already has a history of reworking established continuity to poor results. To what end? Another Summers brother who is completely disinteresting, another story in which Professor X acts like a jerk, a dead X-Men (for absolutely no good reason), and some horrible reworking of existing long running history to cram it all in which now require secrets to have been kept by several key characters for the last 30 years. I want to think that this story was driven by editorial mandate. Unfortunately, this is the second instance in which Brubaker has went back and altered Marvel history from long ago. In Captain America, he made it so that Bucky never really died in World War II. This initially rubbed me the wrong way, but the story itself was done well, and the surrounding plots were good, so I begrudgingly went along for the ride. I was still able to enjoy his entire run on the book. His attempt to revise history doesn't work nearly as well here. The key difference is that Bucky had been considered dead for so long that there was very little continuity to adjust. He hadn't been written into any stories during all that time, so it was very easy to go and insert an alternate history for him. In 'Deadly Genesis', Brubaker inserts events into key storylines from 30 years ago. In order for them to work, the reader needs to believe that several key characters has kept these events a secret from that time forward. It just doesn't work. To make matters worse, none of the characters' motivation for anything makes any sense at all. Characters are keeping secrets, and other characters are upset with that, and through the whole you never understand why. It's as if Brubaker had an end goal in mind, and simply crammed in any plot device necessary to get from point A to point B - even if it required characters to act contrary to their nature or the story didn't make complete sense. The interior art is nice, though not great. Unfortunately, the book falls so short on story alone that the art warrants almost no consideration.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    So I went into this already wanting to not like it. I tried my darndest to keep this from effecting my reading. And think I was fairly successful. Final result: I didn't like it. Brubaker forced the deep dark secret a bit too hard. This becomes especially apparent with the motivations he gives the primary movers. Sometimes writer's try and think of ways to make their big impression. The best way is to go back to the beginning and rewrite it in a shocking twist. The problem is, it is often done fo So I went into this already wanting to not like it. I tried my darndest to keep this from effecting my reading. And think I was fairly successful. Final result: I didn't like it. Brubaker forced the deep dark secret a bit too hard. This becomes especially apparent with the motivations he gives the primary movers. Sometimes writer's try and think of ways to make their big impression. The best way is to go back to the beginning and rewrite it in a shocking twist. The problem is, it is often done for the sake of a twist rather than a good story. Similar to the major character death involved in the story. It is, admittedly, one of my favorite characters, but it is not the death that angers me. It is the execution. It is done, again, for the sake of shock/sales not for the sake of telling a good story. I am personally a fan of great character deaths, morbid as that sounds. They can be a cheap way to get a emotional connection with your audience, but I still love 'em. This one was so tacked on and force it was painful. Oh and the art was really not good for a book of this magnitude. If you are writing a book that you are trying to draw everyone into reading, give it some good art. The Silvestri covers were the best art, and some of them annoyed me to in typical Silvestri fashion, so that's not saying anything good. One of the major impacts of this book I think has been and will be a good step for the franchise, but that does not somehow fix this book of it's problems. This is still an important read if you want to have a bearing on the present state of the X-Men, but I'd recommend thieving it from your neighborhood library or geek as opposed to paying money for it (stealing is not condoned by the writer of this review, he only wanted an excuse for a parenthetical aside).

  10. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    Fresh off my Brubaker high with his take on Captain America – are you getting bored with me gushing about him yet? – I found out that he took over the reigns of the long-running X-Men flagship title a couple of years back. (I’ve also been told to check out his Iron Fist relaunch. But that 70’s Kung Fu shtick still sends shivers of repulsion up my spine.) Despite my love for my friendly neighborhood mutants and Brubaker’s tight plotting and dialogue, I was put-off by the art. Harisine has his mom Fresh off my Brubaker high with his take on Captain America – are you getting bored with me gushing about him yet? – I found out that he took over the reigns of the long-running X-Men flagship title a couple of years back. (I’ve also been told to check out his Iron Fist relaunch. But that 70’s Kung Fu shtick still sends shivers of repulsion up my spine.) Despite my love for my friendly neighborhood mutants and Brubaker’s tight plotting and dialogue, I was put-off by the art. Harisine has his moments – particularly when his style begins to look like a cross between Bryan Hitch (one of my favorites!) and Alan Davis – but in the end, I have to say it will likely be looked back upon as the Marvel House Style of this first decade of the twenty-first century. If you have discriminating taste, and only want to spend your time reading the best in the mainstream super-hero genre (does that contradict itself at times?), ignore this and head for Joss Whedon and John Cassaday’s Astonishing X-Men. Brutal, beautiful, and – yes – truly astonishing is that.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    I found this to be a very satisfying Ret-Con. It took an heroic and epic moment from the X-men's past and gave it a shadier, less heroic re-evaluation. There were just enough secrets and lies added to the story to make it intriguing, but not too much to make it melodramatic and unbelievable. Finally, it created just as many unanswered questions as it did solved mysteries. And it did all of this in the middle of the biggest crisis to hit mutant-kind; namely, the fallout from m-day. I especially li I found this to be a very satisfying Ret-Con. It took an heroic and epic moment from the X-men's past and gave it a shadier, less heroic re-evaluation. There were just enough secrets and lies added to the story to make it intriguing, but not too much to make it melodramatic and unbelievable. Finally, it created just as many unanswered questions as it did solved mysteries. And it did all of this in the middle of the biggest crisis to hit mutant-kind; namely, the fallout from m-day. I especially liked how the series was structured, with 2/3 of each chapter telling the current-time story, and then the last third of each chapter serving as a flashback to the origins of four forgotten x-men. A very effective way to build a plot and feed your reader just enough of the story to keep them guessing. On a side note: I simply love when superheroes take a step back and question whether their actions are for the better or for the worse. This collection had a couple of those moments and they were very well written. 4/5

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    In the devastating aftermath of the House of M, the X-Men are attacked by a mysterious new mutant - but just who is he, and what is his connection to their past? Retcons happen all the time in comics, but not being old enough to remember the issue this references (Giant-Size X-Men #1, in case anyone's interested), the impact was kind of lost on me. 30 years is a long time in comics. Regardless, this isn't a great story. In fact, it's pretty hackneyed. Banshee basically shows up to die, and Vulcan In the devastating aftermath of the House of M, the X-Men are attacked by a mysterious new mutant - but just who is he, and what is his connection to their past? Retcons happen all the time in comics, but not being old enough to remember the issue this references (Giant-Size X-Men #1, in case anyone's interested), the impact was kind of lost on me. 30 years is a long time in comics. Regardless, this isn't a great story. In fact, it's pretty hackneyed. Banshee basically shows up to die, and Vulcan is a godawful villain without any kind of merit. Even his powers are tedious. Sibling immunity to each other's powers has long been an established tradition in Marvel comics, but Brubaker doesn't even bother with that. I laughed at the brief reappearance of Jean, Wolverine's comment "Aw god, not again..." perfectly echoing what the readers must be thinking. If only. That might have been more interesting. I can't help feeling as though Brubaker butchered Professor X. It was hard to sympathise with him, especially when it seems like he spent his time since the House of M drowning his sorrows in Wales rather than getting back in touch with the team, and Vulcan is justifiably pissed off at him. The revelation that he lost his powers isn't that great a reveal, either. Possibly the only good thing to come from this story is the character Darwin, who is fantastic and definitely should have joined the X-Men afterwards. Sadly, he gets shoved off into X-Factor or something. Boo.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    It's almost summer, meaning it is time once again to read ALL THE X-MEN!!!! This time around I'm filling some gaps in my collection before digging into whatever I've missed since the last time I read ATXM, and under this new rule, Deadly Genesis was first up. This book is hella dark, and of course now that I've read it there's at least two more books I never planned to read that I now must if ATXM are ever to be read by me. But I really enjoyed this one -- you can see the seeds of the First Class It's almost summer, meaning it is time once again to read ALL THE X-MEN!!!! This time around I'm filling some gaps in my collection before digging into whatever I've missed since the last time I read ATXM, and under this new rule, Deadly Genesis was first up. This book is hella dark, and of course now that I've read it there's at least two more books I never planned to read that I now must if ATXM are ever to be read by me. But I really enjoyed this one -- you can see the seeds of the First Class film swimming around in here, but mostly who on earth ever approved this book bc the premise is INSANE and you'd never be able to get away with a de-hero-izing story like this one nowadays. Hell, nowadays you can't even make Captain America a Nazi. You can't even reboot Thundercats as if it's for little kids instead of your 40-year-old neckbearding basement-dwelling Youtube-channeling ass. You'd never be able to get away with making Prof X total psychotic evil and then basing ten years of stories on that mojambi if this book were published now. But anyway, they did, and it do, and this is our world now, your world, your world, your world, Thundercaaaaats ROAAAR

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    The third Summers brother was a huge dangling plot thread from when I read the X-Titles religiously (1995-2002). The resolution of that here, after no one demanded it, was a little underwhelming. Professor X is retroactively changed for no other reason than to advance Cyclops. It seemed unnecessary. The villain, Vulcan is cheesy and one note. The art was also inconsistent. I am a big fan of a lot of Brubaker's other stuff but this is pretty stale.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shaun

    This is the second time that I have read this graphic novel. I am still amazed at the death of Banshee and the appearance of the four new X-Men from Krakoa. I was not as shocked at Xavier's mind alterations after the retconed events of Krakoa as I thought I would be. A great read from start to finish that leads to some pretty amazing stories in the X-Men universe.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andre

    There is not really much to say about this series. Sure the basic idea of a failed X-Men team and Xavier being guilty of it might be an interesting one, even if its just a retcon here, but I think the author tried too hard. Also the whole third Summer's son thing... yeah not interesting to me. I think for the most part this was pretty much a waste. Also one thing to the artist: Do your homework!!! I don't know how the first scene ever drawn about the mob attacking Nightcrawler looked like but I can There is not really much to say about this series. Sure the basic idea of a failed X-Men team and Xavier being guilty of it might be an interesting one, even if its just a retcon here, but I think the author tried too hard. Also the whole third Summer's son thing... yeah not interesting to me. I think for the most part this was pretty much a waste. Also one thing to the artist: Do your homework!!! I don't know how the first scene ever drawn about the mob attacking Nightcrawler looked like but I can say this: there has never been an area where anyone in Germany was dressed like the mob here. Their trousers, the hairstyles (which fit neither the 1970s nor any later or earlier decade in Germany), the checkered shirts, the jackets, the hats (some even have cowboy hats) and possibly even the guns. All that is not German but the same bland, hillbilly mob that you see in every run-of-the-mill horror movie about isolated villages full of lunatics. Not to mention that someone having English only as a secondary language like Nightcrawler would probably slip into his mother tongue in such an emotionally charged scene, unlike what we see here. Of course that is another problem with the character altogether: If he was really raised by a "gypsy" from Germany, that woman would have most likely been a Sintezza, therefore he, in a realistic setting, would have been bilingual from an early age on, thereby speaking German and the Sinti form of Romanes called Sinti-Romani or sometimes Sintikes. But there is nothing; so in my mind Nightcrawler is a poorly constructed pseudo-German regarding his ethnic background, and to the Sinti or any other sort of Romani ethnicity he surely does not belong to.

  17. 4 out of 5

    David Edmonds

    As far as retcon's go, this one wasn't too bad. Turns out the team of X-Men that Professor X forms in Giant-Sized X-Men #1 is actually the second team that he sent to Krakoa to rescue the original X-Men. The first set of X-Men he sent were actually students of Moira Mactaggert's, who Professor X quickly trains through mind manipulation and sends off to Krakoa, only to have that entire team seemingly killed on their first mission. The only other person who knows of this tragedy is Cyclops, but Pr As far as retcon's go, this one wasn't too bad. Turns out the team of X-Men that Professor X forms in Giant-Sized X-Men #1 is actually the second team that he sent to Krakoa to rescue the original X-Men. The first set of X-Men he sent were actually students of Moira Mactaggert's, who Professor X quickly trains through mind manipulation and sends off to Krakoa, only to have that entire team seemingly killed on their first mission. The only other person who knows of this tragedy is Cyclops, but Professor X wipes the memory from his mind to make it easier for Cyclops to cope. What I didn't like about this story is that it struck a little too close a cord with the DC Comics mini-series Identity Crisis which was released the year before, in which a terrible mistake in the JLA's past is mindwiped from everyone to keep the secret safe. Deadly Genesis, IMO, was handled well and the repercussions from this story have had significant effects on the X-Men as a whole; I just wish it didn't seem like Marvel was trying to copy the success DC had with so similar of an idea. This volume does introduce us to Vulcan, the mysterious third Summers brother, who quickly becomes one of the X-Men's deadliest villains. It is also a direct lead-in to Rise & Fall of the Shi'Ar Empire, which ran in Uncanny for a full year after this mini-series. Banshee's death is handled well, too. He doesn't seem to have died in vain, and he appears to have remained dead, which doesn't always happen in comics. I personally feel that the X-Men as a whole seemed to be lacking direction post-House of M, but this volume does seem to start to steer them in a somewhat unified direction.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nelson

    Cool story, some interesting things in here. Pretty good writing on Brubaker's part, though not nearly as good as his later work. I really enjoyed the new mutants he invented. Art was variable but overall good, ranging from great to okay. A new reader might be able to read this story with very limited X-Men knowledge. All you need to know are the events of House of M to read this. If you've watched X-Men: First Class, you might notice a lot of parallels in the plot; notably Darwin, who is probab Cool story, some interesting things in here. Pretty good writing on Brubaker's part, though not nearly as good as his later work. I really enjoyed the new mutants he invented. Art was variable but overall good, ranging from great to okay. A new reader might be able to read this story with very limited X-Men knowledge. All you need to know are the events of House of M to read this. If you've watched X-Men: First Class, you might notice a lot of parallels in the plot; notably Darwin, who is probably one of the most interesting mutants in the Marvel universe.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Stewart

    I love the concept. I love Ed Brubaker. I love the X-Men. That said, this just doesn't really stick the landing for me. Maybe it's because I've grown tired of the overly-dramatic nature of X-titles over the years? Yeah, that's probably it. But if you're going to read one of those convoluted, timey-wimey, resurrection-filled X-Men tales, you can do faaaaar worse than this. It's plenty well-written with a solid core story and adequately strong execution.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    I enjoyed Brubaker's interconnected narratives that built into the end of this collection. Vulcan is very one-note, but still, I'm very interested where this will go. Also, Brubaker's new characters, like Darwin, are interesting and well developed.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Great story, but what do you expect? It's Brubaker!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    After reading Dave's review on this site, there isn't much I could say that wouldn't seem like I was just paraphrasing his review. So I'll keep this to general thoughts & impressions: (1) A story like this - with its intended shock value & ramifications - should've been assigned a top-level artist. The art was okay, but nothing spectacular. But Brubaker wasn't yet the big industry name that he is today, so maybe that explains that. But this wasn't Brubaker's finest work - by far - either. (2) The After reading Dave's review on this site, there isn't much I could say that wouldn't seem like I was just paraphrasing his review. So I'll keep this to general thoughts & impressions: (1) A story like this - with its intended shock value & ramifications - should've been assigned a top-level artist. The art was okay, but nothing spectacular. But Brubaker wasn't yet the big industry name that he is today, so maybe that explains that. But this wasn't Brubaker's finest work - by far - either. (2) The story itself feels forced, contrived, and rushed. Forced because I could not get behind it and accept it as presented. Contrived because - OMG - yet another retcon? Please! And rushed, because there were some plot holes and things that were glossed over without explaining/having it make sense. But then again that's what editorial mandates will do to creative freedom... (3) Anything that's hyped is bound to create expectations and - almost invariably - a sense of disappointment due to promises unfulfilled. This book was no exception. (4) Banshee's death left me indifferent. They never seem to pick big names for the now-all-too-common character death that's become the norm almost for any event. Maybe that's why he stayed dead, too. Nobody really misses him. Hmmm... what's worse: Meaningless character deaths that will be reversed by another creative team? or Deaths of meaningless characters that will affect neither their own (fictional) universe nor the readers' emotions?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Will Robinson Jr.

    Outstanding!. I have never read any of the Ed Brubaker X-men stories and decided to dive into this story. I am a avid X-men fan and reading past X-men stories is fun especially when they are this good. Ed Brubaker tells a compelling story here and a very Marvel like story. The X-men find out a startling secret that their beloved Professor Xavier has hidden from them for years. Long ago the original X-men team was held captive by a living island called Krakoa and the Professor fearing the worse b Outstanding!. I have never read any of the Ed Brubaker X-men stories and decided to dive into this story. I am a avid X-men fan and reading past X-men stories is fun especially when they are this good. Ed Brubaker tells a compelling story here and a very Marvel like story. The X-men find out a startling secret that their beloved Professor Xavier has hidden from them for years. Long ago the original X-men team was held captive by a living island called Krakoa and the Professor fearing the worse but a B team together with his colleague Moira McTaggert. Because he had to put this team together quickly he in desperation used his Mind control powers to aid in training this rag tag team of mutant newcomers and sending them on an impossible mission to rescue Cyclops and his team. This team included the villain of this story Vulcan who has ties to Scott Summers aka Cyclop's past. I really enjoyed how Brubaker used the side stories of the new mutant characters to build the mystery. There are some great emotional moments in this book and some incredible surprises. This was a great X-men tale and am looking forward to the Brubaker X-men tale.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This was a really interesting, beautifully rendered and organized story of the X-men mythology. The art is fantastic, and the range of characters made me really happy! I'm such a fangirl sometimes. The story delves into some secrets of Xavier's, and sets up Cyclops for some serious awakenings... it's a good graphic novel that necessitates minimal knowledge of the X-men backstory, and happily can stand alone.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Philip

    While I enjoyed the retconning of the entire Krakoa episode, I didn't enjoy the way-too-easily tied together ending. Abrupt and shoe-horned come to mind. Still, it is a welcome addition to X-Men history and I'm always a fan of the master/disciple tension between Cyke and the Prof, and Deadly Genesis provides one of the biggest obstacles to their often strained relationship.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    I went into this book with a lot of hesitation. I read some online reviews of it criticizing the plot for being too cheap and lousy. I would disagree. Brubaker and Co. revitalized the X-Men and seem to set up the story for the next volume. I loved how he nicely blended the past X-Men mythology with new twists and insights, too.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Baba

    The jumping on point for Ed Brubaker's X-Men with a story combining the past, present and future. Although a huge re-imagining of the past, the tension build up in the early part of the series is pretty riveting; but the best thing is the concept.. first time readers should be quite thrilled. A solid 8 from 12 from me, mainly for the concept, as the storytelling could have been a fair bit better.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lord

    One of the best X-men books I've ever read. I can understand people not being satisfied with some plot holes, but I don't really mind. The idea of another X-men team that has been lost during the early days is interesting enough and Brubaker executed it flawlessly.

  29. 4 out of 5

    M

    When a mysterious villain begins striking at the X-Men from the shadows, a dark secret from Professor Xavier's past is slowly brought into the light. While I admit the trend to demonize Xavier in modern X-books is in play here, the story does benefit from his indescretions and introduce new lore.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mel

    What the hell, Brubaker? No. Just no. This was like reading a damn soap opera. And I wish I skipped this comic. Oh god, how I wished I skipped this comic. It was a giant waste of time, honestly. Too messy and filled with cliches and plot holes.

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